Jefe's House

Tag: west bengal

Contacting the Dead in West Bengal

by on Feb.18, 2015, under On the Road, Shaheb Cafe, The Truth Is In Here

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A Shaheb’s Guide to India

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I’ve traveled India a bunch in the past five years and have learned that almost no one in India seems to have heard of a Ouija board. I’ve also been in tons of stores ranging from rustic bazaars to gleaming shopping malls and have never seen a Ouija board for sale even though they have plenty of other Western toys and board games.

People there do, however, know what you’re talking about when you explain it, only they call it “doing planchette” and those who do it would only ever make their own. The idea of buying one seems foreign to them. Culturally, “doing planchette” seems to hold the same place as it does here: spooky, scary, forbidden, inviting doom, naughty, tempting, very real. Once I got my wife’s Hindu family elders talking about it, they recalled tons of stories that pretty much parallel the kinds of escapades you hear recalled in the US.

Her great uncle warned me against it, telling me there’s a reason God has created two separate dimensions for the living and the dead, and that to try and bridge the gap is inviting trouble. He then told me how once as a young man he and a bunch of friends were vacationing in a small shack in the jungle on a wildlife preserve (the Indian version of the “cabin in the woods” archetypal horror setting) and one evening they got bored and someone made a planchette board. They typically use a coin as the planchette. They soon were in touch with a man who said he was recently deceased. He said he was a Naxalite (Indian Marxist rebel) who had recently been killed by a rival Communist. At that moment the lights went out, engulfing them in darkness. Everybody freaked, they balled up the planchette board and threw it away and my great-uncle vowed never to do the planchette again.

He remains true to his word. I asked him if he would draw one for me exactly as they had drawn them back in the day, and he grimly said, “This is not possible.”

I dropped the subject but later that evening I approached my wife’s grandmother to ask the same question. She shrugged and said, (continue reading…)

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Four Pairs of Sandals as an Act of Faith

by on May.15, 2013, under On the Road, Shaheb Cafe, The Press, The Truth Is In Here

May15, 2013

On Faith

Four Pairs of Sandals as an Act of Faith

Walking a mile in another man’s shoes leads to kismet

by Jeffrey Stanley

Three years ago I got married to my wife Bidisha in a traditional Hindu Bengali ceremony in Kolkata and spent three weeks touring the country. I bought a pair of sandals there which I wore throughout my trip and back home here in the States. This December my wife, our young son and I went back to India for a month to visit relatives. I brought my well-worn “India sandals” with me.  A week into the visit they broke irreparably and I tossed them. The location of their demise seemed appropriate — from India they had come and to India they would return. The next day while we were out sightseeing we stumbled upon a tiny shoe store, one of a zillion in Kolkata, where I found the perfect pair of replacement sandals. They were simple but unique enough that they suited me as a souvenir.

Nakhoda Masjid. Kolkata, West Bengal, India. January, 2013.

A few days later I struck out on my own for a sightseeing visit Nakhoda Masjid, the largest mosque in Kolkata, built in 1926. A billboard told me with no intended irony that this was Road Safety Week in India. Still the taxis, auto-rickshaws and pedestrians were up to their usual danse macabre.

After a requisite insane cab ride and a short walk down a crowded, narrow street full of screaming sidewalk merchants selling Muslim prayer rugs and other Islam-themed souvenirs I found the mosque. It was sparsely populated at that late morning hour. The (continue reading…)

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The Absolutely Breathtaking Nakhoda Masjid

by on Feb.20, 2013, under On the Road, Shaheb Cafe

These photos were taken mid-morning between prayers so the place was nearly empty. January, 2013. Please also enjoy my related 5/15/13 Washington Post article about my otherworldly encounter with Allah just after I took these photos,Four Pairs of Sandals as an Act of Faith”.

"Nakhoka Masjid" sign in Arabic outside main entrance.
"Nakhoka Masjid" sign in Arabic outside main entrance.
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Prayer clocks
Prayer clocks
Muslim prayer times. Right to left it's the Fajar (dawn prayer), Zohar (midday prayer) Asar (afternoon prayer), Magrib (sunset prayer) and Esha (nighttime prayer). The last one, Juma, is the Friday prayer.
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Inlaid marble floors
Inlaid marble floors
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1st floor courtyard and covered reflecting pools
1st floor courtyard and covered reflecting pools
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2nd floor
2nd floor
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View from the 4th floor of Rabindra Sarani Street that runs alongside the mosque.
View from the 4th floor of Rabindra Sarani Street that runs alongside the mosque.
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A distant worshipper on the 3rd floor
A distant worshipper on the 3rd floor
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3rd floor; dig the ornate lattice work.
3rd floor; dig the ornate lattice work.
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Stained glass
Stained glass
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4th floor
4th floor
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Covered reflecting pools in 1st floor courtyard
Covered reflecting pools in 1st floor courtyard
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Main entrance on Zakaria Street
Main entrance on Zakaria Street
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Mosque kitty
Mosque kitty
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Time to Free Tibet

by on Feb.18, 2013, under On the Road, Politics, Shaheb Cafe

(News Flash: Jeffrey Stanley’s BONEYARDS reincarnates in Philly this June at the Art Church of West Philadelphia as part of the 2015 SoLow FestTickets and full details here.)

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Enjoy these 16 images I took in January, 2013 at the Tibetan Refugee  Self-Help Centre in Darjeeling, West Bengal, India in the foothills of the Himalayas just over the mountain from Tibet.  And if you support the idea that it’s time for China to get out of Tibet and leave the people and their natural resources alone then feel free to share the images with others.

Tibetan Refugee Self-Help Center Orphanage
Tibetan Refugee Self-Help Center Orphanage
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Welfare Center for Tibetan Children
Welfare Center for Tibetan Children
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"Welfare Centre for Tibetan Children, donated by National Christian Council, Aug. 1963
"Welfare Centre for Tibetan Children, donated by National Christian Council, Aug. 1963
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Refugee Centre Store
Refugee Centre Store
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Workshop where some of the handicrafts are made that are sold in the store.
Workshop where some of the handicrafts are made that are sold in the store.
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Your purchase will help the people of this centre; our products are not sold outside shop.
Your purchase will help the people of this centre; our products are not sold outside shop.
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This site of 3.8060 acres is the gift of The American Emergency Committee for Tibetan Refugees, September 1964. Save Tibet.
This site of 3.8060 acres is the gift of The American Emergency Committee for Tibetan Refugees, September 1964. Save Tibet.
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Original site of the centre started in October 1959 with four workers and two rooms.
Original site of the centre started in October 1959 with four workers and two rooms.
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Intro to the Tibetan Buddhist prayer wheels on the premises.
Intro to the Tibetan Buddhist prayer wheels on the premises.
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Om Mani Padme Hum (or hung)
Om Mani Padme Hum (or hung)
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Prayer wheels.
Prayer wheels.
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Refugee handicrafts worker.
Refugee handicrafts worker.
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More refugee handicrafts workers.
More refugee handicrafts workers.
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Another refugee handicrafts worker.
Another refugee handicrafts worker.
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Rug in progress.
Rug in progress.
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Rug in progress.
Rug in progress.
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I Heart Paan

by on Dec.01, 2010, under NYC, On the Road, Shaheb Cafe, The Press

I heart paan

I bought tobacco paan from this walla near the Belur Math monastery along the banks of the Ganges in West Bengal, India.

This week’s New York Press, “New York’s Plummy Weekly Newspaper,” cover story is my monologue thinly disguised as an essay, ‘Confessions of a White, Middle-Aged Paan Eater’, the title a loose parody of Thomas de Quincey’s scandalous 1821 memoir Confessions of an English Opium-Eater.

Enjoy the article, go to your nearest Indian grocer and enjoy some meeta paan, and if you’re craving more dope on the delicacy here’s a short clip of me ordering it from a paan walla just across from the ancient Udayagiri and Khandagiri Caves in Bhubaneswar, the capital of the state of Orissa in eastern India, this past January (footage courtesy of documentary filmmaker David Gaynes).


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And the article…

Confessions of a White, Middle-Aged Paan Eater

JEFFREY STANLEY is addicted to what may arguably be India’s most disgusting export

I pull my hat low as I pound the rain-slicked sidewalks of Curry Hill around noon on a frigid November weekday. I look about furtively as I walk up Lexington, stopping outside of a DVD shop before I dart inside. There I meet my sugar man, a Punjabi who only goes by the nom de commerce Arora.  By now I know his real name, but he likes to go by the one-word moniker.  I’m happy to…CONT’D>>

[IHeartPaan logo, paan walla photo and video are property of me. Logo via nypress.com]

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